Doris Truong, Tumbling

Aug 16

Thanks for the excellent turnout for our early-morning session at the Asian American Journalists Association convention in Washington, D.C.

Here are the top 10 takeaways that **David Steinberg, T.J. Ortenzi **and I shared for _your _best writing for the Web:

Use the “blank piece of paper” test.
Know your audience. Do they have 5 minutes or 5 hours?
Include terms in the metadata that you would use if you were searching for the post (hint: this usually does not involve your byline).
Be bright, witty and clear, but don’t try to trick people.
Know the rules. Then break them.
If it works, use it again.
If it’s not working, try something else!
Think of tweets as a micro-story.
Seize readers’ attention from the start with the best tools for the job.
Incorporate video, audio and photos. Give people something
they can’t get elsewhere.

Thanks for the excellent turnout for our early-morning session at the Asian American Journalists Association convention in Washington, D.C.

Here are the top 10 takeaways that **David Steinberg, T.J. Ortenzi **and I shared for _your _best writing for the Web:

  1. Use the “blank piece of paper” test.
  2. Know your audience. Do they have 5 minutes or 5 hours?
  3. Include terms in the metadata that you would use if you were searching for the post (hint: this usually does not involve your byline).
  4. Be bright, witty and clear, but don’t try to trick people.
  5. Know the rules. Then break them.
  6. If it works, use it again.
  7. If it’s not working, try something else!
  8. Think of tweets as a micro-story.
  9. Seize readers’ attention from the start with the best tools for the job.
  10. Incorporate video, audio and photos. Give people something they can’t get elsewhere.

Aug 11

3 recommendations for #AAJA14 visitors

We’re only days away from another fabulous Asian American Journalists Association convention.

Besides boosting your journalism know-how through the many great convention sessions, plus networking with people from around the world (be sure meet our AAJA-Asia delegates!) and exploring the Career Expo, you should get out to see the nation’s capital.

Eat: Check out this flowchart if you’re not sure what to nosh on 14th Street, one of the hottest dining neighborhoods. Or head to the U Street Corridor to find an Ethiopian restaurant; it’s one of D.C.’s staple cuisines. Once you’re on U Street, you might as well seek out Ben’s Chili Bowl, too, but be prepared to pay unless you’re Bill Cosby or POTUS.

Pay your respects: If you haven’t been to D.C. in recent years, venture to the Tidal Basin to see the MLK Jr. Memorial. If you have more time, visit Arlington National Cemetery, which is easily accessible by Metro.

Go to the museum of journalism: Newseum admission is good for two consecutive days. And be sure to check out “News for All,” the exhibit featuring AAJA’s own Angry Asian Man.

Have fun, and remember to use #AAJA14 to share all your experiences.

Jul 22

“Be with someone who gives you the same feeling as when you see food coming to you at the restaurant.” — Pamela Woon

Jul 08

What are YOUR top tips for digital journalism?

Henry Fuhrmann of the Los Angeles Times, David Steinberg of the San Francisco Chronicle and I are presenting at this year’s Asian American Journalists Association convention.

We’re interested in your best practices for attracting an online audience. If you have tidbits you’d like to share, please fill out the form below or go to this link. (Credit will be given if your contribution is used!)

May 30

Work in the Heart of Texas: Dallas Morning News Seeks Austin Bureau Chief

[Austin Capitol. Photo: Creative Commons]

This job posting comes from my former colleague Ryan Rusak, who would be an outstanding supervisor. You could shape the direction of political coverage in an influential city (and the barbecue there isn’t too shabby, either).

The Dallas Morning News seeks an energetic, dynamic reporter/team leader to head its state government and politics coverage as Austin Bureau chief.

The ideal candidate will be an enterprising reporter who is equally adept at spot news, short-term enterprise and quick investigations. What’s required: background as a skilled writer, communicator and strong generator of reader-grabbing story ideas. The bureau chief needs the proven ability to develop and maintain diverse sources in a highly competitive and fast-paced setting. And the bureau chief needs the vision and leadership skills to see that reporters meet their maximum potential in a dynamic environment.

Capital coverage is a franchise for The News, and our bureau is in the center of legislative coverage, statewide politics, Texans as presidential candidates, state agency developments, influential policy changes and all manner of Lone Star personalities.

We’re looking for a person with ideas on how to shape the bureau for the news landscape to come and transform our watchdog journalism into the digital age. Data-analysis and digital journalism skills are a must, along with a proven track record of producing cause-and-effect journalism.

The successful candidate must be able to collaborate well with several editors and news departments and partner with Dallas-based reporters and editors. We strongly prefer five years of government and political reporting experience, and two years in state capital or congressional reporting.

Please send a resume and cover letter by June 30 to Ryan Rusak, state government and political editor, rrusak@dallasnews.com.

May 11

This week’s installment of “let’s eat” for Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month is a two-fer in case I don’t have a chance to post next Sunday (I’ll be somewhere between Edinburgh and London then).

I love to support family-owned businesses, and Tim Ma has two great choices: Maple Ave Restaurant in Vienna, Va., and (closer to me) the recently opened Water & Wall in Arlington, Va.

Both serve updated comfort-food favorites (though MAR is a shoebox of a restaurant, and parking can be a challenge). I like the Asian flavors on the menus: creme fraiche wings come with Korean chili paste, and a touch of fish sauce deepens the flavors of the bouillabaisse.

Both restaurants also serve brunch! Check out the pumpkin pancakes and pecan shortbread bar. I still need to try the six-course tasting brunch at MAR one of these Sundays ($38 for two, which is really reasonable for the plates of food I’ve seen coming out of the kitchen).

Lots of interesting wines, beers and cocktails are also on the menus. The staff make excellent pairing suggestions.

The image at the top of this post, taken in February, shows MAR’s seared scallops with coconut-scallion risotto and basil ice cream.

This week’s installment of “let’s eat” for Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month is a two-fer in case I don’t have a chance to post next Sunday (I’ll be somewhere between Edinburgh and London then).

I love to support family-owned businesses, and Tim Ma has two great choices: Maple Ave Restaurant in Vienna, Va., and (closer to me) the recently opened Water & Wall in Arlington, Va.

Both serve updated comfort-food favorites (though MAR is a shoebox of a restaurant, and parking can be a challenge). I like the Asian flavors on the menus: creme fraiche wings come with Korean chili paste, and a touch of fish sauce deepens the flavors of the bouillabaisse.

Both restaurants also serve brunch! Check out the pumpkin pancakes and pecan shortbread bar. I still need to try the six-course tasting brunch at MAR one of these Sundays ($38 for two, which is really reasonable for the plates of food I’ve seen coming out of the kitchen).

Lots of interesting wines, beers and cocktails are also on the menus. The staff make excellent pairing suggestions.

The image at the top of this post, taken in February, shows MAR’s seared scallops with coconut-scallion risotto and basil ice cream.

May 04

To celebrate 2014 Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, I’m going to post a “let’s eat” suggestion each Sunday highlighting a favorite foodie hangout where Asian Americans are prominent in the kitchen.

To kick things off, my favorite ramen house in the D.C. area: Toki Underground, 1234 H St. NE.

It’s not true Japanese style, but the broths are incredibly complex and flavorful, the decor is skater chic, and the service is friendly. Plus, Toki offers made-to-order dumplings — pan-fried is an option at dinnertime — and amazing red-miso-butter chocolate-chip cookies. If you’re thirsty, the Toki Monster is a fantastic cocktail that comes with a side of seared pork belly.

If you’re lucky, you’ll get to see Erik Bruner-Yang, recent winner of Cochon 555. He’s busy getting Maketto ready to open down the street, but in the meantime, you can have some of Maketto’s amazing bao at Union Market.

You’ve heard about the legendary wait at the tiny Toki? Never fear! Delivery is here.

My love of ramen is well documented, and you cannot go wrong at Toki. Just not on Sundays, because that’s their day of rest.

The image at the top of this post, taken at Toki during dinner service, was part of the 2013 Smithsonian “I Want the Wide American Earth" exhibit.

To celebrate 2014 Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, I’m going to post a “let’s eat” suggestion each Sunday highlighting a favorite foodie hangout where Asian Americans are prominent in the kitchen.

To kick things off, my favorite ramen house in the D.C. area: Toki Underground, 1234 H St. NE.

It’s not true Japanese style, but the broths are incredibly complex and flavorful, the decor is skater chic, and the service is friendly. Plus, Toki offers made-to-order dumplings — pan-fried is an option at dinnertime — and amazing red-miso-butter chocolate-chip cookies. If you’re thirsty, the Toki Monster is a fantastic cocktail that comes with a side of seared pork belly.

If you’re lucky, you’ll get to see Erik Bruner-Yang, recent winner of Cochon 555. He’s busy getting Maketto ready to open down the street, but in the meantime, you can have some of Maketto’s amazing bao at Union Market.

You’ve heard about the legendary wait at the tiny Toki? Never fear! Delivery is here.

My love of ramen is well documented, and you cannot go wrong at Toki. Just not on Sundays, because that’s their day of rest.

The image at the top of this post, taken at Toki during dinner service, was part of the 2013 Smithsonian “I Want the Wide American Earth" exhibit.

May 03

1 Reporting Fellow Will Cover 5 Journalism Conventions

Do you know of an outstanding college student or a recent graduate who could benefit from reporting on and networking with thousands of journalists from diverse backgrounds this summer? Is that person you?

UNITY: Journalists for Diversity is looking for stellar candidates to be the inaugural UNITY Reporting Fellow. The fellow will have the unprecedented opportunity to learn from members of the Asian American Journalists Association, the National Association of Black Journalists, the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, the Native American Journalists Association, and the National Lesbian & Gay Journalists Association.

The deadline to apply is May 30. Good luck!